Sunday, April 24, 2011

Handmade Coat Rack

finished.
 first we mocked everything out in the 1/2" black steel... we used two 4 foot pipes for the sides, and a 3 foot pipe for the top and two 18" pipes with a union for the bottom... we changed a few things at this point..
 bottom structure... changed to T's instead of elbows... needed to use 3" pipes to support the wood shelf...
 then added a 45 degree elbow and plug at the top for a hanging front and back hook...
 moved the union and 18" pipes to the bottom to be covered by the wood shelf... *a union must be used because the threading on one side of your pipe will unscrew itself as you tighten the opposite side...
 we used two 1"x8" oak for the shelf... joined together underneath...I wanted to use old (free) wood and nothing we had was wide enough and/or long enough...
then sanded down the wood, applied some Linseed oil, and then some furniture polish to darken the markings and scratches... after that measured out the distance between the base pipes to cut out room to slide the wood into place on top of the bottom feet (pipes)... after that just sanded the cuts and burrs and dropped the wood into place.... then we had the final product...
total cost: $71.00 and a great time... 
thanks Dad for troubleshooting and letting me use your toys!

52 comments:

Brian Hayes said...

Nice. I have a friend that did most of the side tables in his coffee shop this way. Looks great and easy to maintain.

Jordan said...

Awesome job. Thanks for documenting.

Zack said...

Fantastic!

Mitchell said...

The coat rack looks great. Nice work.

james at 10engines said...

boss

Brett said...

I'm not sure what's cooler: the finished product or the fun you must have had with your dad building it. Just special all around.

Ryan E. Plett said...

Yup, my father and I are always thinking through ways to make or fix or tinker on something... he is by far superior at fixing or dreaming up ways to accomplish anything...

it's astounding what skills people who work with their hands are capable of...

which people may notice here on the good old blog... I love shit that is well made and has a story... this will be used every day and always remind me of the good time.

James said...

Superb~ Love the new coat rack, thanks for sharing!

kappy said...

wicked.

Eli said...

At risk of sounding inept (which I am)...So you drilled holes in the wood and screwed the pipes together through those holes? But what's going on with that screwdriver?

Ryan E. Plett said...

Eli- no worries, first we measured the distance between the two pipes... then on each end of the board at that measured distance we drilled with a 1/2" drill bit, a relief hole to use as the rounded edge where the pipe would sit. Then took a jigsaw and cut straight out from those relief holes to make a U shaped hole on each end.

then the board is simply dropped into place... no screw no nothing, the two poles hold the board in place.

Good question.

Trevor said...

I think the "screwdriver" Eli mentioned is really a spade bit attached to the drill, used to bore the initial hole. At first I thought you just dropped the board down over the vertical pipes, but I like the U-cut idea even better.

This is really cool looking.

How heavy is it the whole thing? I'm curious how stable it would be on carpeting.

Ryan E. Plett said...

Trever - Eli,

Yeah I think thats what he meant as well...

Trever- I'd say 25 ish... super light weight, carried it into the condo today with one hand and my bags in the other... should work on carpet as well... I'd lengthen the bottom feet though to be wider, I used 3" pipe out of the T's. i'd maybe step up to 5" on both sides...

glad you liked it!

Ryan E. Plett said...

*Trevor! Sorry...

Antti Ja Taru said...

Wow! So nice, just my taste. great inspiration for my new coming house. Thanks.

Ryan E. Plett said...

Thanks everyone, I had no idea everyone would enjoy this so much.. I'm going to have to put my other ideas into play...

Next up: Bookcase, end table, and suspension floor lamp...

Bert Keuken said...

Wow! Very nice, excellent execution.

Max said...

Ryan,

I'm throughly impressed at the finished product. And speaking for us all: let's see more for sure.

Mitchell said...

Yeah Ryan, keep em coming. I prefer seeing these type of DIY projects on blogs sometimes more than cool new threads. The way you documented it made it easy to follow too.

Cheers.

AdoreVintage.com said...

This is fantastic. A future project to keep in mind.

NH said...

Looks great! Any chance of making one to order?

Ryan E. Plett said...

NH- probably be more to ship it then for you to make it yourself from parts at a hardware store... should be available anywhere...

NH said...

Not sure we have the same parts here. would you be able to email me the parts list and measurements?
studio@begindesign.co.uk

jonahliza said...

this is awesome..thanks so much for the great diy <3

Ryan E. Plett said...

thanks man, glad you like it!

Anthony said...

Excellent design! What are those feet things?

SteveEllwood said...

Seen the shelves @jwz made back in 1998?

http://www.jwz.org/bookcase/

Daniel said...

Just wondering why you did not just use a T at the top corners instead of using the extra elbows.

Tyro Prate said...

Really nice. My wife and are having twins in a few month and what will be their nursery lacks a closet. I had thought about doing something like this, but mounted to the wall. The only reason I haven't yet is that, in my experience, that black pipe is covered in a smelly oil. Did you use something to take that off, or did yours not have that on it? Are you concerned about damaging your coats.

Anyway, thanks for sharing this project.

Ryan E. Plett said...

Daniel- just kinda liked the rounded edges...

Tyro- first thing I did! haha...

Goo-Gone spray bottle! All gone!

JC said...

The top and bottom are reversed in the second picture, which is initially confusing as it is in direct contradiction to the text.

I had to read the rest to verify that the union does indeed go on the bottom.

Ryan E. Plett said...

as the text states, we tried first with the union on top and then switched it around... not too confusing I imagine... this wasn't blueprinted out so we had to make it work...

Asfand Yar Qazi said...

I was thinking of making a pull-up bar in my flat that could also be used as a clothes rack...... now I know how!

Stu said...

I'm gonna make a tonne of these for my next home they look great!

Jesse said...

Ryan, thanks for the great inspiration. A note to others who want to try this: don't forget to take into account the extra width that the union will add to the bottom crossbar. Your bottom pieces should be slightly shorter than 18" each if you keep the top bar 36". I found this out the hard way.

Excellent excuse to hang out with Dad for a day.

Margo Anderson said...

To make a portable rack, you can mount the bottom flanges on a piece of 3/4" plywood with locking castors underneath. You might want to shorten the uprights a bit.

Keith Sandall said...

Awesome! How long do you think you can go before you loose the rigidity if the rack. Do you think 5' would be too long?

Chris Pollock said...

Really nice looking rack, similar to these clothing racks built with Kee Klamp pipe fittings.

Emzi said...

That is really cool!

Luca said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Luca said...

tried and true, mine HERE

Atticus Green said...

Just wanted to say thanks for posting this!! I actually just built this and it was not to hard. I paid just about $76 in total.

Steve Pena said...

Hello Ryan, thanks for sharing this great idea. I actually went out and madde 2 of these racks this weekend. i have to ask though how did you get all the black residue off the pipes ? Currently this is a big problem for me and I am assuming that you were able to strip off all the back residue so this that will not rub off on any of your clothes. I need to find something before I use these rack. Any help would be great, Steve stevep4172@hotmail.com

The Anti Blog said...

Great idea and project! I just made one out of 3/4" industrial galvanized pipe, using a solid piece of figured walnut. 3/4" is obviously more expensive, but it give it a lot more oomph. It might be the only thing left standing in an earthquake!

I also made a 5 tiered, 8' bookshelf using the same material.

Looks great, very sturdy, and quite functional.

Thanks for the ideas!

ADEQUATE STEEL FABRICATORS said...

Hello, I love reading through your blog, I wanted to leave a little comment to support you and wish you a good continuation. Wish you best of luck for all your best efforts. clothing racks, slatwall display.

wilson said...

Really cool stuff guys! Had a question I hoped someone could answer - I'm not all that experienced in this field and was wondering how you tracked down your steel piping. Does the local Home Depot do the trick or did you order online somewhere?

I'm thinking aesthetically, I like the look of this one and some of the other links posted here and wasn't sure if I should be searching for a specific manufacturer or style.

Thanks for the help!

Unknown said...

Love it! Would you be okay with me using the photos for a swedish diy blog? You'll get credit obviously.

Nolan Dueck said...

Thanks for posting, this is really great. Question, did you find all the pipes and fittings just at a regular hardware store? Are they all standard plumbing components?

achikochi said...

A full parts list would be great.

Ashley Rounds said...

I made this a month ago and I love it and so do my friends! Simple, and fun to build. DIY baby.

cabinets NJ said...

Your project is unbelievably awesome! With $71, you were able to come up with something I want to have. To be honest, I have never tried DIY projects but I will give it a shot with this design. I just hope the results will be just as I expect. Thanks a lot for sharing!

penny said...

Wow...this looks like something from an Anthropologie catalog. Just gorgeous! I love working with pipe, you can make almost anything, but few things end up looking as good as this.